DeepResource

Observing the world of renewable energy and sustainable living

Archive for the category “algae”

Self-Heating Building with Algae

Renewable energy is generally associated with windturbines and solar panels. It is often ignored that electricity is only part of the entire energy story. In northern Europe for instance an average household needs to pay more for space heating than for electricity on a yearly basis. The BIQ building in Hamburg could provide the solution for an energy-neutral home that collects solar energy all year around and stores part of the solar energy in the form of algae. The algae biomass can be used for gas production and is easier and cheaper to store than warm water. Up-front capital costs are high though: $2500/m2. Reduction on fossil fuel cost to date is 33%. This number could increase if solar panels are placed on the roof, used to produce electricity to power heat pumps.

[fastcompany.com] – This Algae-Powered Building Actually Works (2014)
[doggerel.arup.com] – Tomorrow’s architecture, starring algae and hemp (2016)

Advertisements

BioAlgaeSorb

BioAlgaeSorb is an EU-Norwegian project. From the Cordis site:

The BioAlgaeSorb collaboration will benefit European SME-AGs in diverse business sectors by developing technologies for remediating and valorising industrial and agricultural/aquacultural effluents via microalgae cultivation. The resultant microalgal biomass will form a carbon neutral, environmentally sustainable raw material that is a source for commercially valuable end products, among them renewable energy. The set task is to utilise unwanted effluents as nutrient sources for photosynthetic microalgae, thereby reducing effluent discharge by SMEs and yielding high quality biomass which will be harvested and upgraded using an integrated biorefinery approach into valuable products.

[cordis.europa.eu] – BIOALGAESORB EU project
[ec.europa.eu] – What is an SME?

Algae-for-Fuel Breakthrough?

Previous attempts to boost the oil concentration in algae — an important step in biofuel production — failed because the cells stopped growing when they were overloaded with lipid. The new genetic process maintains growth until 40 per cent of the biomass consists of lipid, an industrially useful level.

[the-american-interest.com] – Finally, a Biofuel to Get Excited About

Biofuel Breakthrough: Quick Cook Method Turns Algae Into Oil

Michigan Engineering researchers can “pressure-cook” algae for as little as a minute and transform an unprecedented 65 percent of the green slime into biocrude… Once producing biofuel from algae is economical, researchers estimate that an area the size of New Mexico could provide enough oil to match current U.S. petroleum consumption.

[ns.umich.edu]

Microalgae Lamp Absorbs CO2

Youtube text: Shamengo pioneer Pierre Calleja has invented something truly remarkable–an algae lamp that absorbs CO2 in the air–at the rate of 1 ton PER YEAR, or what a tree absorbs over its entire lifetime! While development is still needed to make a cost-effective product, the microalgae streetlamp has the potential to provide significantly cleaner air in urban areas and revolutionize the cityscape.

Turning Algae Into Fuel In One Minute

Youtube text: Converting algae to biofuel could be a sustainable solution to the need for liquid fuel in the United States, according to U-M researchers. Scientists in the chemical engineering department are working to create an effective method for converting the plant, which can be harvested continuously and grown in any water condition. About the professor Phil Savage is the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Michigan. His research focus is on energy production from renewable resources, developing novel processes for converting biomass hydrogen, methane, and liquid transportation fuels.

Researchers at the University of Michigan have been experimenting with cooking green marine micro-algae and found that one minute is all it took to get 65% of their source material transformed into biocrude. They also used a wet algae, rather than having to dry it in the manner that is used in the more conventional process.

[cleantechnica.com]

Read more…

Post Navigation