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Archive for the category “algae”

Algae-for-Fuel Breakthrough?

Previous attempts to boost the oil concentration in algae — an important step in biofuel production — failed because the cells stopped growing when they were overloaded with lipid. The new genetic process maintains growth until 40 per cent of the biomass consists of lipid, an industrially useful level.

[the-american-interest.com] – Finally, a Biofuel to Get Excited About

Biofuel Breakthrough: Quick Cook Method Turns Algae Into Oil

Michigan Engineering researchers can “pressure-cook” algae for as little as a minute and transform an unprecedented 65 percent of the green slime into biocrude… Once producing biofuel from algae is economical, researchers estimate that an area the size of New Mexico could provide enough oil to match current U.S. petroleum consumption.

[ns.umich.edu]

Microalgae Lamp Absorbs CO2

Youtube text: Shamengo pioneer Pierre Calleja has invented something truly remarkable–an algae lamp that absorbs CO2 in the air–at the rate of 1 ton PER YEAR, or what a tree absorbs over its entire lifetime! While development is still needed to make a cost-effective product, the microalgae streetlamp has the potential to provide significantly cleaner air in urban areas and revolutionize the cityscape.

Turning Algae Into Fuel In One Minute

Youtube text: Converting algae to biofuel could be a sustainable solution to the need for liquid fuel in the United States, according to U-M researchers. Scientists in the chemical engineering department are working to create an effective method for converting the plant, which can be harvested continuously and grown in any water condition. About the professor Phil Savage is the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Michigan. His research focus is on energy production from renewable resources, developing novel processes for converting biomass hydrogen, methane, and liquid transportation fuels.

Researchers at the University of Michigan have been experimenting with cooking green marine micro-algae and found that one minute is all it took to get 65% of their source material transformed into biocrude. They also used a wet algae, rather than having to dry it in the manner that is used in the more conventional process.

[cleantechnica.com]

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