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Archive for the category “UK”

ITM Power Upbeat of Hydrogen Storage Market

Shell opening its first hydrogen fueling station based on ITM hardware.

[wikipedia.org] – ITM Power

Read more…

Funding for 100 MW Hydrogen Electrolyser Feasibility Study

ITM Power (AIM: ITM), the energy storage and clean fuel company, is pleased to announce funding from Innovate UK for a feasibility study to deploy a 100MW Power-to-Gas (P2G) energy storage project, “Project Centurion” at Runcorn, Cheshire, UK.

This world class project explores the electrolytic production, pipeline transmission, salt cavern storage and gas grid injection of green hydrogen at an industrial scale. The feasibility study will explore the system design and costs and will assess the business case for deployment.

The vision for Project Centurion is to demonstrate a 100MW P2G energy storage system which can produce low carbon hydrogen for heat, decarbonisation of industry, and transport fuel. Once successfully demonstrated, such systems can make a significant contribution to the decarbonisation of the electricity and gas networks, and by coupling these two networks together provide energy storage, allowing the UK energy system to accommodate increasing amounts of renewable energy, reducing curtailment and constraints. As well as contributing to decarbonisation, P2G systems can improve security of energy supply and improve the UK balance of payments by producing indigenous fuel offsetting the need to import fuel.

The transport of hydrogen by pipeline to salt caverns near Lostock, where it can be stored pure or blended with natural gas, will be explored, along with the feasibility of injection into the local gas network. Other potential demands for the hydrogen will be assessed, including industrial and transport use which will support existing studies in the area, particularly Cadent’s HyNet NW… objectives are: to produce a 100MW system design with costs significantly below current targets

These considerations apply to countries like Holland and Denmark as well, as they are both “equiped” with a large shallow part of the North Sea, ideal for the production of raw renewable electricity, that can be converted in hydrogen-fuel with 80-90% efficiency and at a cost of 0.5 cent/kWh.

[itm-power.com] – 100MW POWER-TO-GAS (P2G) ENERGY STORAGE FEASIBILITY STUDY
[proactiveinvestors.co.uk] – ITM Power lands feasibility funding for ambitious Cheshire energy storage project
[Google Maps] – Runcorn (near Liverpool)

UK Nuclear Future in Doubt After Japanese Withdrawl

Two Japanese investor groups, Toshiba and Hitachi, are said to be on the verge of withdrawing from earlier plans to develop two new nuclear projects in Cumbria and Wales resp.

[insert rubbing hands-sound from Danish, German and Dutch offshore wind developers in the background here]

[dailymail.co.uk] – Britain’s nuclear future is thrown into chaos as Japanese firm gets set to pull out of £16b illion deal

Sunamp Heat Battery

Phase-change based heat storage. The active material remains mysterious and is UK/China-patented, with phase change occurring at 58 Celsius.

[sunamp.com] – Company site
[sunamp.com] – Sunamp brochure

UPDATE:

[sunamp.com] – Sunamp heat batteries

According to this source the active material could be “Strontium Bromide hexahydrate” (SrBr2.6H2O) with (still secret) additives, patents pending.

At room temperature, strontium bromide adopts a crystal structure with a tetragonal unit cell and space group P4/n. This structure is referred to as α-SrBr2 and is isostructural with EuBr2 and USe2. Around 920 K (650 °C), α-SrBr2 undergoes a first-order solid-solid phase transition to a much less ordered phase, β-SrBr2, which adopts the cubic fluorite structure.

Here is the Sunamp patent:

[patents.google.com] – Strontium bromide phase change material

Abstract

There is herein described a phase change material (PCM) for use in energy storage systems. More particularly, there is described a phase change material comprising Strontium Bromide and a Metal Halide that is optimal to storing heat in about the 76ºC to 88ºC temperature range.

Driving Patterns

A 2016 British study can give us an idea of how the car is being used. Results: most trips are rather short, with 95% less than 25 miles and 66% less than 5 miles. However, if you add all journeys below and above 25 miles, the results is about 50-50. The number of all trips, short or long, has declined over the past 12 years.

Combining the data, perhaps a compromise solution for future transport architecture could be: private ownership of a cheap, light-weight vehicle for 1-2 persons, like the Carver in the previous post, for the short distances, that still comprise 95% of all trips and do the rest with public transport, like bus and train and later autonomous driving vehicles. A range of 100 km would suffice for that purpose and allow for relative light batteries.

[licencebureau.co.uk] – Road Use Statistics Great Britain 2016
[sciencedirect.com] – On the distribution of individual daily driving distances

Shell Plans Return to UK Offshore Wind

Royal Dutch Shell says it is considering bidding for rights to develop offshore wind farms in UK waters as the British-Dutch oil and gas giant seeks to re-enter the nation’s sector after a 10-year absence.

Dorine Bosman, Shell’s wind chief, said the company was interested in seabed leases due to be awarded during 2019 by the Crown Estate, which controls Britain’s coast. The Dutch-based firm left the UK offshore wind sector when it sold its stake in the London Array project 10 years ago.

A global pioneer in the field, the UK was one of the key offshore wind markets Shell wanted to enter, she said. The oil major says it is investing US$2 billion a year in developing “new energies” or low-carbon power.

Shell co-owns a minor offshore wind farm in the Netherlands and a larger Dutch project which is under construction. In December it spent US$175 million entering the tiny US market, acquiring the rights to New Jersey and Massachusetts seabed leases that could potentially generate 4.1 gigawatts of wind power.

[energy-reporters.com] – Shell plans return to UK offshore wind

Prof. Gorden Hughes At It Again

Prof. Gorden Hughes has launched his usual attacks against the wind industry again:

The report’s author, Prof Gordon Hughes, an economist at Edinburgh University and a former energy adviser to the World Bank, discovered that the “load factor” — the efficiency rating of a turbine based on the percentage of electricity it actually produces compared with its theoretical maximum — is reduced from 24 per cent in the first 12 months of operation to just 11 per cent after 15 years.

[telegraph.co.uk] – Wind farm turbines wear sooner than expected, says study

We have dealt with prof. Hughes before:

[deepresource] – Wind Turbine Lifespan
[ed.ac.uk] – Prof Gordon A. Hughes

North Sea UCG

“We think there are between three trillion and 23 trillion tonnes of coal buried under the North Sea,” explained Dermot Roddy, former professor of energy at Newcastle University.

“This is thousands of times greater than all the oil and gas we have taken out so far, which totals around six billion tonnes. If we could extract just a few per cent of that coal it would be enough to power the UK for decades or centuries.”

[worldcoal.com] – Huge coal deposits discovered in North Sea
[ingenia.org.uk] – Underground coal gasification (2010)



Dr Dermot Roddy

[coalresearchforum.org] – The commercialisation of UCG
[ukccsrc.ac.uk] – Dr Dermot Roddy
Dermot Roddy is Five-Quarter’s Chief Technology Officer, leading the company’s highly-specialised and innovative technological remit. He joined the company directly from Newcastle University, where he was Professor of Energy. Dermot is an internationally-respected industry professional and academic, with extensive energy and related downstream industry experience in both the traditional and renewable sectors. He began his working life in academia (with Bachelor and Doctorate degrees from Queen’s University, Belfast), before branching out into industry, working his way up to leadership positions with ICI (overseeing the building and running of chemicals factories) and Petroplus International in the Netherlands. Dermot’s previous positions include being Chairman of Northeast Biofuels; a Director of the UK Hydrogen Association; the VP of the Northeast Electricity companies Association and a Member of the Energy Leadership Council. Prior to his tenure as Professor of Energy at Newcastle University, Dermot was the CEO of Renew Tees Valley, which delivered significant economic regeneration through inward investment and expansion of indigenous businesses in renewable energy.

Storage Now the Key Botttleneck of Renewable Power

Renewable power generation has matured sufficiently to become main stream. Now the next challenge is how to store intermittent renewable power economically to level off supply and demand fluctuations.

Surplus Energy Economics

Tim Morgan proposes an energy- and EROI-centric view of the economy instead of a financial-centric approach.

Our comment: we do not know the work of Tim Morgan, but agree that energy is a far more important factor to explain the economy than finance. We are not as pessimistic that prosperity is a thing of the past and believe that technology can compensate for loss of cheap fossil energy.

[surplusenergyeconomics] – #108: SEEDS goes public
[economist.com] – Terrifying Tim from Tullett
[gresham.ac.uk] – Speaker dr. Tim Morgan
[amazon.co.uk] – Life After Growth: How the global economy really works – and why 200 years of growth are over

From Amazon.co.uk:

Why, years after the banking crisis, is the global economy still mired in recession and burdened by enormous debts? Why have the tried-and-tested economic policies of the past failed us this time? In Life After Growth, leading City analyst Tim Morgan sets out a ground-breaking analysis of how the economy really works. Economists are mistaken, he argues, when they limit their interpretation of the economy to matters of money. Ultimately, the economy is an energy system, not a monetary one. From this, it follows that we need to think in terms of two economies, not one – a ‘real’ economy of work, energy, resources, goods and services, and a parallel, ‘financial’ economy of money and debt. These two economies have parted company, allowing the financial economy to pile up promises that the real economy cannot meet. Starting with the discovery of agriculture, Tim Morgan traces the rise of the economy in terms of work, energy and resources. The driving factor, he explains, has been cheap and abundant energy. As energy has become increasingly costly to obtain, the potential for prosperity has diminished, to the point where growth in the real economy has ceased. An immediate problem is that our commitments – including debt, investments and welfare promises – cannot be honoured, which means that we can expect the financial system to be wracked by value destruction. At the same time, we need to adapt to a future in which prosperity can no longer be taken for granted. #lifeaftergrowth

ScottishPower Into 100% Wind

[Google Maps] Shoreham gas power plant

Scottish power company ScottishPower announced on Tuesday that it has completed the sale of its traditional generation business to British electrical power generation company Drax Group for £702 million in cash, resulting in ScottishPower becoming the first integrated energy company in the UK to shift completely from coal and gas to wind power…

Note that the Shoreham plant won’t be decommissioned, so no short term climate advantages are realized here. But the signal is clear:

This makes ScottishPower the first vertically integrated UK energy company to exit coal and gas electricity generation and the first to transition to being powered entirely by renewable energies.

ScottishPower can set itself up as a “100% green power company” and expand its customer base accordingly.

[scottishpower.com] – 100% Green Generation for ScottishPower with Sale of Remaining Gas Plant
[cleantechnica.com] – ScottishPower Ditches Remaining Gas Plants In Move To 100% Wind
[deepresource] – World-Record Pumped-Hydro Storage for Scotland?
[Google Maps] – Location Southern England (not Scotland)

Royal Dutch Shell to Become Renewable Energy Leader

Royal Dutch Shell is preparing to “turbocharge” its bid to become a global leader in clean energy in the coming years as it seeks to overcome the “existential” challenge posed by climate change, boss Ben van Beurden has told The Sunday Telegraph… “The biggest calling card we have is scale. We can scale much faster than anyone else,” he added.

[telegraph.co.uk] – Shell set to ‘turbocharge’ its clean energy drive in the 2020s
[shell.com] – Shell Energy Transition Report [pdf]


Ben van Beurden earlier this month participated in Energy Week forum in Russia, joining a panel together with Russian president Vladimir Putin.

[shell.nl] – Shell to develop geothermal energy in the Netherlands

[fluxenergie.nl] – Shell Pernis-refinery to heats tens of thousands of households

[fluxenergie.nl] – Innogy and Shell in floating wind turbines

Read more…

Pumped Hydro Storage Proposal for Loch Ness

Urquhart Castle, Loch Ness

400 MW, 2.4 GWh pumped hydro storage plant proposed for Loch Ness by ILI Energy, enough to power 400,000 households for 6 hours. Scotland has 2.4 million households and in 2017 69% of its electricity generating capacity was renewable, mostly wind. By 2020 this share is expected to be increased to the full 100%.

[ilienergy.com] – Major hydro project proposed for Loch Ness
[wired.com] – Scotland’s next Loch Ness monster could power 400,000 homes
[spiegel.de] – Loch Ness soll als Energiespeicher dienen

Britain Rules the Waves of Offshore Wind

This graph depicts the total amount of offshore wind projects that are “in the pipeline”, a branch of sport dominated by Europeans, who are lucky to own large, shallow water tables in the North Sea, Irish Sea and Baltic Sea, with excellent wind speeds (>10 m/s average). These 600,000 km2 combined have the potential to supply the entire EU with clean electricity three times the current consumption. Currently the British are adopting wind energy at a breath-taking speed, pun intended, although the developers and equipment producers are mainly continental Europeans, that is Danish, Germans, Dutch, Norwegians, Swedish, whose industries are growing rapidly and have the potential to become the successors of the Anglo Seven Sisters oil giants of the 20th century.

[cleantechnica.com] – UK Leads Offshore Wind Rankings As Global Pipeline Increases 10% In 2018, Reports RenewableUK
[deepresource] – The Enormous Energy Potential of the North Sea
[wikipedia.org] – Seven Sisters (oil companies)
[deepresource] – Gold Mine North Sea
[deepresource] – Goldmine Windenergy

Dockwise Used to Transport Windfarm Jackets From Gulf

Offshore wind moving into the area formerly reserved for giant oil platforms only. The world’s largest heavy lifting vessel Dockwise Vanguard of the Dutch based Boskalis was used to transport 36 jackets from Lamprell’s construction yard in Jebel Ali to Vlissingen, from where they will eventually be installed in the 714 MW East-Anglia ONE offshore wind farm. Partners: ScottishPower Renewables (developer), Boskalis & van Oord (logistics), Lamprell (jackets), Siemens (102 x 7 MW turbines + rotor blades).

[offshorewind.biz] – Lamprell Hires Dockwise to Transport East Anglia ONE Jackets
[offshorewind.biz] – First Lamprell-Produced EA1 Jackets Arrive in Vlissingen
[wikipedia.org] – East Anglia Array

Gravitricity

Dutch-British project involving storing/retrieving electricity by lifting/sinking large weights in a mine shaft (59,000 of those in the UK alone). Claim made by startup “Gravitricity”: power up to 20 MW per installation, life span ±50 year and a storage efficiency of 80 à 90%.

[wattisduurzaam.nl] – Nederlands-Brits team bouwt mijnschacht om tot energieopslag
[euanmearns.com] – Short-term energy storage with “Gravitricity” – iron versus ion
[physics.stackexchange.com] – Why don’t we use weights to store energy?

Live Energy Production Data

[gridwatch.co.uk] – UK

MeyGen Tidal Power

MeyGen is the worlds largest tidal energy plant which is currently in construction. The project uses four 1.5 MW turbines with 16m rotor diameter turbines submerged on the seabed. The project is owned and run by Tidal Power Scotland Limited and Scottish Enterprise. The high speed of currents in the area, reaching up to 5 metres per second (11 mph), made the chosen site in the Pentland Firth well suited to this type of energy generation… In December 2016 it was announced that the first turbine had begun full power operations, and all four turbines were installed by February 2017. Atlantis plans for 400 MW.

[wikipedia.org] – MeyGen

[atlantisresourcesltd.com] – Company site
[theguardian.com] – World’s first large-scale tidal energy farm launches in Scotland

Siemens, Airbus and Rolls Royce Aim at Hybrid Electric Plane by 2020

[reuters.com] – Siemens, Airbus, Rolls-Royce team up on hybrid-electric propulsion

Renewable Energy Skeptic David MacKay

[wikipedia.org] – David J. C. MacKay
[withouthotair.com] – David MacKay official site
[inference.org.uk] – MacKay’s magnum opus “Sustainable Energy — without the hot air” (pdf, 12MB)

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