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Archive for the category “Netherlands”

Solar Driving – State of the Art

Darwin-Adelaide 3021 km (Stuart Highway)

Available data World Solar Challenge 2017:

[worldsolarchallenge.org] – The 41 teams
[worldsolarchallenge.org] – Dashboard, timing

Speed racing

Nuna Solar Team TU Delft: 3021 km, 14:10:41, average speed 81.2 km/h

Cruising

Solar Team TU Eindhoven: average speed 69 km/h, 6 charges, 10197 person-km, 45.7 kWh external energy, average passengers: 3.4, energy efficiency (person-km/kWh) 223.2

Note that the external energy was necessary due to the long distance of 3021 km in merely 6 days. If the available time would have been 12 days, no extra electricity would have been required. In other words, the daily range without external (grid) charging (but “24h” solar charging) under Australian conditions in October would be ca. 250 km with 5 persons.

Eindhoven btw drove with 5 persons until a major technical malfunction occurred, after which no risks were taken and a single driver-passenger completed the race alone, which pressed down the passenger average. If you offset these 250 km with a daily average distance of merely 37 km in an industrialized country like Holland, you can verify that an energy-autonomous car is not a pipe-dream at all.

[wikipedia.org] – Stuart Highway

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How a Transition Piece is Made?

[smulders-projects.com]

Shell Introduces Cardissa Floating Gas Station

Cardissa tanker vessel

In a global trend of the world’s 50,000 largest ships moving away from relatively dirty fuel oil towards LNG, Royal Dutch Shell has introduced the South-Korean built Cardissa, a vessel able to refuel ships at sea with LNG and as such provide more flexibility. The future of LNG in shipping looks bright since the global acceptance of the Paris Accords. Heavy fuel oil is one of the dirties fuels around, due to its sulfur content.

[businesskorea.co.kr] – LNG Emerging as Marine Fuel
[eniday.com] – LNG fuel and the shipping sector
[lngworldnews.com] – Shell’s first LNG bunkering vessel on way to Europe
[helderline.nl] – Cardissa
[marinetraffic.com] – Cardissa

Crane Aeolus Jack-Up Vessel Being Upgraded

Pictures from Schiedam harbor near Rotterdam. The 900 tons crane of the offshore wind jack-up vessel Aeolus is being replaced with a 1600 tons one to prepare the ship for installation of heavier 8 MW wind turbines. Investment volume 300 million euro. The ship is playing an important role in getting the planned 4.5 GW offshore wind capacity installed by 2020 (Germany 6.5 GW and UK 10 GW by 2020). The Aeolus is able top operate in water depths of up to 45 m. The crane adaption has to be made only 3 years after the ship was commissioned, illustrating the rapid pace with which the offshore wind sector is developing and subsequent price decline.

In 2016 the Dutch government was prepared to subsidize 12 cent/kWh, but Danish Dong offered to do it for 7.27 cent. Later Shell, Van Oord, Eneco and Mitsubishi/DGE were awarded the tender for Borssele III & IV for merely 5.45 c/kWh. In Germany tenders were awarded for wind parks to be built in 2024-2025 with no subsidy at all. Won’t be long until wind developers will be fighting over available offshore locations for the privilege of being allowed to build ever larger wind farms.

In 2017 technology has advanced to the tune that monopiles are installed with an 8 m diameter, 80 m long and weighing 1300 tons. Vestas and Siemens are building 8 MW turbines and the next steps towards 10-15 MW machines are being prepared. The Aeolus can install one foundation per day.

[heavyliftnews.com] – “Aeolus” of Van Oord being upgraded with stronger Crane
[maritiemnieuws.nl] – Huisman gaat voor 300 miljoen aan nieuwe kranen bouwen
[ayop.com] – Van Oord lays strong foundations for wind
[maritiemnederland.com] – Waar liggen de limieten in offshore wind?
[noordzeeloket.nl] – Noordzeeloket

Lagerwey L136 4.5MW Onshore WindTurbine Construction

Location: Eemshaven, the Netherlands.
A second L136 tower will be built by the end of the year with a self-climbing crane (see video at the bottom), turning the tower in a self-constructing wind turbine.

[lagerwey.de] – Lagerwey builds the first L136 4.5MW turbines for Growind
[lagerwey.de] – L136-4.0-4.5MW

Still waiting for this one to materialize:

Gasunie Joining North Sea Wind Power Hub Consortium

Earlier today the Dutch company Gasunie has joined the North Sea Wind Power Hub Consortium. The aim is to build an artificial “energy island” in the middle of the North Sea, where wind power to the tune of 100 GW will come together eventually and distributed to countries neighboring the North Sea. Furthermore the participating partners (Netherlands, Germany and Denmark) are serious about producing hydrogen and store it in empty gas fields under the North Sea.

dogger island map north sea

[nos.nl] – Nederlandse energiereuzen gaan wind- en zonne-energie opslaan
[infrasite.nl] – Gasunie treedt toe tot North Sea Wind Power Hub consortium
[wikipedia.org] – Gasunie
[tennet.eu] – Gasunie treedt toe tot North Sea Wind Power Hub
[renews.biz] – Gasunie backs island vision
[renewablesnow.com] – Gas grid operator joins North Sea wind hub concept
[arstechnica.com] – North Sea Wind Power Hub: A giant wind farm to power all of north Europe
[deepresource] – Important Step Taken Towards Energy Hub North Sea
[deepresource] – Power to gas

Lagerwey Climbing Crane

A wind tower is essentially a support structure to carry the nacelle and rotor. The wind turbine company Lagerweij conceived that a large crane used to build up the huge wind power structure is not necessary at all, but that the wind tower under construction can serve as its own crane. This reduces the construction cost of a wind turbine considerably. Additionally, more areas become suitable for placement of wind towers that were inaccessible for heavy cranes before, like dikes, mountain ridges or draughty terrain.

Giant cranes like the one here in Austria won’t be necessary anymore [1:29].

[nl.wikipedia.org] – Lagerwey
[lagerweywind.nl] – Lagerwey ontwerpt ’s werelds eerste klimmende kraan

Fort McPherson, Canada, Permafrost & Climate Change

A team of the Dutch national news NOS traveled to the northern tip of Canada (68 degrees Northern latitude), that is Fort McPherson, to report about the visible effects of climate change. Note that both men are dressed in shirts (18-20 degrees Celsius), the environment is surprisingly green and there is no snow or ice and instead lots of mosquitoes. In the old days winter temperatures of minus 30-40C were normal, nowadays minus 20C is the new normal.

[wikipedia.org] – Fort McPherson, Northwest Territories

Fort McPherson, Northern Territories, Canada

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17th Century Dutch Wind Power

You can’t be a great power if you have no functioning efficient energy base. In the 20th century that #1 power was the United States and its oil-based economy. In the 19th century that #1 power was Britain and its coal and steam-engine. In the 17th century the #1 power was the Netherlands and its windmill-based economy. Thousands of windmills were used to pump water away to claim new land and sawmills produced the planks with which the Dutch could build a fleet of 30,000 ships, three times more than the rest of the world combined, used to set up a global empire and en passant to keep the English away.

The lesson for the 21st century is that again that political unit will be the geopolitical “top dog” who embraces a new energy base first. That energy base can only be a renewable energy base, born out of the necessity to combat fossil fuel depletion and climate damage. A united Europe is well-placed to be that political unit and the only one with a coherent renewable energy policy (“completely fossil free by 2050”), but China is taking renewable energy serious as well. And although Washington has no real renewable energy policy worth mentioning, on a state level, like Texas and California, successful initiatives do exist. It is too early for anyone to claim victory.

[wikipedia.org] – Energy policy of the European Union

The #1 reserve currency is a good indicator of geopolitical preeminence.

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ECN Eindadvies Basisbedragen 2016

Dutch language report from the Dutch national energy institute ECN concerning the price structure and price recommendation of renewable energy.

[ecn.nl] – Eindadvies basisbedragen SDE+ 2016
[jaspervis.wordpress.com] – Wat kosten kern en wind?

TenneT Doetinchem-Wesel 380kV

European supergrid latest. Construction of a 380kV electricity line between the Netherlands and Germany, which should replace the existing 1926 110kV line. Note the futuristic design of the pylons. EU “project of common interest” status.
Length: 57 km

[doetinchem-wesel380kv.nl] – Official project site
[de.wikipedia.org] – 380-kV-Leitung Wesel–Doetinchem

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Schiphol Airport to Run on 100% Renewable Energy in 2018

[source] Amsterdam Airport is the home of KLM

It all began with Dutch Rail, but now Schiphol Airport near Amsterdam wil also run entirely on renewable electricity as of 2018. For that purpose the energy producer Eneco for the next 15 years will deliver 200 GWh annually to Schiphol (64m), the third airport in Europe after London (76m) and Paris (66m) in terms of passengers and surpassed Frankfurt (61m) last year. The electricity will be entirely sourced from ‘Hollandse wind’.

The amount of electricity equals the consumption of a town like Delft (100,000) and will mostly be used for cooling and airconditioning. With 64 million passengers annually, each producing 120 Watt (or 150 Watt if the suitcase is very heavy) at a temperature level of 37 Celsius, there is very little need for space heating. Where Dutch Rail invested in 8 windparks all over Europe, Schiphol will be provided with electricity from new Dutch wind parks only.

Comment: this is exactly what you want to see happening, major top notch companies setting the tone in the energy debate. After Dutch Rail, Schiphol is yet another Dutch company that switches to 100% renewable energy for its (on-the-ground) operations. Expect other major companies not wanting to stay behind and provide themselves with a “green image” as well, creating a run on renewable energy.

This creates a new “problem”: there is not enough supply of renewable energy. However this “corporate green pull” will greatly stimulate offshore installation companies to expand their businesses, backed by fat, multi-year contracts with large companies, eager to show the world how green they are.

[schiphol.nl] – Royal Schiphol Group draait vanaf 2018 volledig op Hollandse wind
[parool.nl] – Schiphol stapt volledig over op Nederlandse windenergie
[wikipedia.org] – List of the busiest airports in Europe
[nos.nl] – Schiphol nu derde luchthaven van Europa
[deepresource] – Contracts Signed for 752 MW Offshore Wind of Dutch Coast
[deepresource] – Dutch Rail Runs 100% on Wind Power
[deepresource] – 100+ Companies Committed to Corporate Renewable Energy
[deepresource] – Electric Flying

First Climate Neutral Power Station in The Netherlands

[source] Magnum power station, 8 billion euro, 1.3 GW, high efficiency (58%) natural gas power station that was built from 2009 in Eemshaven in the north of The Netherlands.

A memorandum of understanding has been signed between Statoil, Vattenfall and Gasunie last month. The intention is to convert one of the existing three units of the Magnum power plant in Eemshaven into a facility where hydrogen rather than natural gas will be burned as of 2023. Statoil will produce the hydrogen from natural gas, but will store the resulting CO2 byproduct under ground. This will result in the first climate neutral hydrogen power station in the world (440 MW). Currently Norway is busy constructing a so-called CO2-vault of its west coast and likes to see the Dutch power station in Eemshaven as one of its first customers.

The production of hydrogen from natural gas is merely a temporary solution and must be seen as a preparation for a later stage, when the hydrogen must come from the new offshore wind power stations in the neighboring North Sea, where electricity will be used in an electrolysis process to split water in hydrogen and oxygen. The hydrogen will be converted into ammonia for easier storage and eventually be burned at Magnum. Hence the description of the power station as an “ammonia battery“.

[statoil.com] – Evaluating conversion of natural gas to hydrogen
[nl.wikipedia.org] – Magnum (energiecentrale)
[volkskrant.nl] – Eerste klimaatneutrale energiecentrale ter wereld komt in Eemshaven
[bellona.org] – First ever climate neutral power plant
[snn.eu] – Aandacht in Den Haag voor noordelijke energie ambities

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Prof. Ad van Wijk

“There is no energy crisis” is the adage of prof van Wijk. Lecture Masdar Institute of Technology in Abu Dhabi.

The concept of the “hydrogen economy” is still very much alive in The Netherlands and one of its main proponents is prof. Ad van Wijk, sustainable energy entrepreneur and part-time Professor Future Energy Systems at the Delft University of Technology.

Van Wijk is currently pushing for the North of the Netherlands to embrace the hydrogen economy as a substitute for the outgoing natural gas age, to be fueled by rise of the North Sea as the coming energy power house of the Netherlands and the EU.

[profadvanwijk.com] – The Green Hydrogen Economy in the Northern Netherlands
[twitter.com] – Ad van Wijk twitter account

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Nuna 9 Revealed

The Delft University has revealed its new model to participate in the Australian Solar Challenge cross continental race in less than two months time.

[news.vattenfall.com] – Nuna9 – A lion in the shape of a solar car
[wikipedia.org] – World Solar Challenge
[nl.wikipedia.org] – Nuon Solar Team
[deepresource] – TU-Eindhoven Presents Stella Vie
[worldsolarchallenge.org]

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European North Sea Energy Alliance

The old and near obsolete North Sea oil & gas infrastructure can be reused for the coming reneweable energy base, where the North Sea will play a central role. Core themes ENSEA:

Energy system: The infrastructure and processes that deliver power to end users and includes the electricity and gas supply networks, power generators (both large and centralised land small and decentralised) and other assets.

Balancing: Regulation of energy production, storage and consumption in order to equalise the production and consumption at any time (e.g. by quick regulating gas power plants) to keep the electrical energy system secure.

Back up: Energy production capacity which is in standby to react quickly when there is a difference in energy production and consumption e.g. because of fluctuating production of renewable energy sources like wind and solar energy.

Storage: Small capacity storage and high power pumps (e.g. flywheels or batteries) capable for operating for minutes or hours, or larger capacity storage necessary for extended periods without production from renewable sources.

Infrastructure (electricity grid): Smart grid infrastructures designed for both supply to customers as well as production of power within these grids.

[ensea.biz] – European North Sea Energy Alliance
[wikipedia.org] – OSPAR Convention
[ensea.biz] – ENSEA flyer
[deepresource] – Gold Mine North Sea

Jutland/Denmark now also member of ENSEA:

[ensea.biz] – Associated Partner Denmark

[wikipedia.org] – Sabatier reaction

CO2 + 4H2 → CH4 + 2H2O   ∆H = −165.0 kJ/mol

Hydrogen can be won from water and electrolysis, using renewable electricity. Hydrogen is explosive and needs to be stored at very low temperatures. By mixing it with the superfluous greenhouse gas CO2 (an exothermic reaction, meaning you get extra heat), you get methane, which is far easier to handle. And you solve the storage problem.

The Speed of the Energy Transition

July 22, 1959. Natural gas discovered on the land of boer Boon, near Slochteren, the Netherlands.

The European Union is the major political force in the world with the most ambitious climate and renewable energy goals, for which they should be commended. Their goal is to get rid of most fossil fuel consumption by 2050. Is this realistic?

We say it is, even overly conservative. Let’s have a look at a radical energy transition in the relative recent past, the transition to natural gas in the Netherlands in the sixties.

On July 22, 1959, the NAM (Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij) discovered natural gas at a depth of 2500m on the land of boer Boon (“farmer Bean”). It took a while until scientists realized the enormous size of the gas stock, but eventually they did and in 1963 the Dutch government decided to build a nation-wide pipeline network and ten years later 75% of the Dutch households were connected.


Boer Boon received less than 1000 euro for a gas find to the tune of 267 billion euro.

The difference between the natural gas development of the sixites in the Netherlands and the European renewable energy ambitions is that in the latter case, the network already exists. For sure, adaptions will be necessary, new major power lines constructed, sub-sea cables to Norway laid for storage purposes, but not the most costly “last miles”.

In Europe the situation is somewhat comparable with that in the Netherlands of the early 60s. We “discovered” a “new” source of energy, wind and solar, that is present in abundance and meanwhile prices have come down to a level where they are competitive with fossil sources of energy. Additionally there is the climate and depletion aspect that makes these renewable sources of energy extra attractive, if not unavoidable if we want to meet out climate goals as laid down in the Paris Accords.

With the speed of the transition realized in the sixties in mind, we do not deem it impossible that a large part of the intended energy transition could be realized before 2030.

[nam.nl] – Historie van aardgas en aardolie
[deepresource] – Netherlands Sustainable by 2030
[deepresource] – The Netherlands Fossil Free in 2030

Generating Electricity From Fresh-Salt Water Interfaces

Dutch language video, English subs

Prof. Kitty Nijmeijer (University Twente, the Netherlands) explains how it is possible to generate electricity from membranes, separating fresh and salt water. This has great implications for the Dutch energy situation and the dike called the Afsluitdijk in particular:

Pictures of the closure of the Afsluitdijk in 1932.

[wikipedia.org] – Afsluitdijk
[deepresource] – Blue Energy
[deepresource] – Blue Energy Pilot Plant Operational in the Netherlands

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2-B Energy – Back To Two Blades

3-blade turbines have become the standard in present day wind energy development. The Dutch company 2-B Energy argues that for offshore, wind 2-blades could perhaps be a better design. First of all from a maintenance perspective: in case of a defect, nacelle and rotor can be lifted from the tower in one piece and brought to a maintenance location, onshore or nearby offshore. Furthermore the company claims to be able to realize lower production costs. A first 2-b wind turbine has meanwhile been installed in Eemshaven, in the North of the Netherlands, see video below. Installation rotor downwind and able to rotate freely around a vertical axis, ensuring automatic direction towards an orientation perpendicular to the wind flow. Dimension nacelle 17 m, large enough for a helicopter to be able to land on top of it. Gain: less material, easier maintenance. 2-B Energy is participating in the Methil offshore project off the coast of Scotland.

[2benergy.com] – Company site
[offshorewind.biz] – Forthwind Cleared to Install Two-Bladed Turbine Duo off Scotland
[wikipedia.org] – Methil Offshore Wind Farm

At [1:33] you can see the test-installation of the 2-B wind turbine in Eemshaven. Visually it is not a very attractive installation, but it is intended for offshore operation anyway.

Prof. Sinke: 100% Renewable Energy Base Feasible in 2050

Dutch language, English subtitles

Prof. Sinke is in the Netherlands the #1 authority in the field of photo-voltaic energy. For his contribution to the development of solar energy he was nominated as “Knight in the Order of the Netherlands Lion”. Prof Sinke is optimistic regarding the prospects of solar energy world-wide and believes that the EU policy of phasing out fossil fuel by 2050 and replace it with renewable energy is feasible.

[ecn.nl] – ‘100 procent duurzame energie is haalbaar’ Geridderde professor Wim Sinke voorziet spectaculaire groei van PV-markt

[wikipedia.org] – Order of the Netherlands Lion

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