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Archive for the category “wind”

Britain Rules the Waves of Offshore Wind

This graph depicts the total amount of offshore wind projects that are “in the pipeline”, a branch of sport dominated by Europeans, who are lucky to own large, shallow water tables in the North Sea, Irish Sea and Baltic Sea, with excellent wind speeds (>10 m/s average). These 600,000 km2 combined have the potential to supply the entire EU with clean electricity three times the current consumption. Currently the British are adopting wind energy at a breath-taking speed, pun intended, although the developers and equipment producers are mainly continental Europeans, that is Danish, Germans, Dutch, Norwegians, Swedish, whose industries are growing rapidly and have the potential to become the successors of the Anglo Seven Sisters oil giants of the 20th century.

[cleantechnica.com] – UK Leads Offshore Wind Rankings As Global Pipeline Increases 10% In 2018, Reports RenewableUK
[deepresource] – The Enormous Energy Potential of the North Sea
[wikipedia.org] – Seven Sisters (oil companies)
[deepresource] – Gold Mine North Sea
[deepresource] – Goldmine Windenergy

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Dockwise Used to Transport Windfarm Jackets From Gulf

Offshore wind moving into the area formerly reserved for giant oil platforms only. The world’s largest heavy lifting vessel Dockwise Vanguard of the Dutch based Boskalis was used to transport 36 jackets from Lamprell’s construction yard in Jebel Ali to Vlissingen, from where they will eventually be installed in the 714 MW East-Anglia ONE offshore wind farm. Partners: ScottishPower Renewables (developer), Boskalis & van Oord (logistics), Lamprell (jackets), Siemens (102 x 7 MW turbines + rotor blades).

[offshorewind.biz] – Lamprell Hires Dockwise to Transport East Anglia ONE Jackets
[offshorewind.biz] – First Lamprell-Produced EA1 Jackets Arrive in Vlissingen
[wikipedia.org] – East Anglia Array

Two-Blade Wind Turbines Are Back, This Time Offshore

Why three blades if two blades work as well? It is all the fault of 1970s Danish garage pioneers, who insisted there needed to be three blades. NASA did experiment at the same time with 2-blades (WTS-4), but that project was cancelled under Reagan, who decided that oil was American, not wind. And now we are stuck with three blades.

Or are we? The originally Dutch company Sea Wind Technology is betting on two-blades, especially for offshore, with higher wind speeds (higher loads) and more difficult installation.

Advantages two blades:

– simpler design
– less material (50% less weight, no heavy tower/monopiles necessary)
– easier offshore transportation and mounting (just pile them up)
– simpler installation vessels, flat barges suffice
– more rotor flexibility, 2 degrees of freedom: rotating and teetering, reducing load
– 2% less electricity gain, but offset by much lower installation and operational cost
– Levelized cost (LCOE) reduction: 50%

[seawindtechnology.com] – Company site
[linkedin.com] – Two-bladed offshore turbines could cut the cost of energy by 50%
[linkedin.com] – Why two blades are better than three for floating wind turbines
[crunchbase.com] – Seawind Ocean Technology
[windpowermonthly.com] – Are three blades really better than two? (2011)
[interestingengineering.com] – The Scientific Reason Why Wind Turbines Have 3 Blades

Offshore wind hub Eemshaven in the Netherlands. After [1:30] you see an (onshore) two-bladed windturbine in operation.

[gic.nl] – Nieuw type windmolen met slechts twee wieken getest in Eemshaven

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Boskalis Monopile Scour Protection

[wikipedia.org] – Boskalis

[source]

Dutch Company TenneT Plans 30 GW Offshore Wind Park

Dutch grid company TenneT is working on a serious plan to build a giant wind park of 30 GW in the middle of the North Sea, on the Dogger Bank, around a to-be-build artificial energy island (€1.5 billion), that is supposed to work as a power hub to distribute wind power to the surrounding countries Holland, Britain, Norway, Denmark and Germany. The island could be completed as early as 2027. The wind park will dwarf anything we have seen so far in the realm of offshore wind (think 630 MW).

[theguardian.com] – Is this the future? Dutch plan vast windfarm island in North Sea
[businessinsider.com] – The Dutch plan to build the world’s biggest wind farm
[wikipedia.org] – Dogger Bank

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“Coming 10-15 Years Offshore Wind Will Be Booming”

Key figures power production The Netherlands

Average power consumption: 13 GW
Total power capacity: 29 GW
Size coming generation turbines: 8 MW nameplate power
North offshore capacity factor: 50% nameplate power

In other words: the Netherlands needs to install 13 GW / 8 MW / 0.50 = 3250 offshore 8 MW wind towers.
Modern jack-up vessels like the Aeolus (see video below) can install a single wind tower per 24h.
In other words, the energy transition of the Netherlands can in theory be accomplished within 10 years with a single jack-up ship. Dutch companies have several of these ships operational.

The bottle neck is not installing the monopiles but storing the generated wind power and convert it into H2 or NH3.

[offshorewind.biz] – Sif Gathers Steam in 2017

De-icing Wind Turbines

Haliade-X 12 MW Largest Offshore Wind Turbine To Date

The French company Alsthom (owned by General Electric) has presented what is the largest offshore wind turbine to date, the Haliade-X, with a nameplate power of 12 MW and a record capacity factor of 63%. One turbine generates enough electricity to power a small city of 16,000 French households. Rotor blades: 107 meter. Yearly production: 67 GWh.

The turbines will be built in Saint-Nazaire, Western France:

[offshorewind.biz] – GE Unveils Operation Haliade-X 12 MW
[gerenewableenergy.com] – HALIADE-X Offshore Wind Turbine Platform
[cleantechnica.com] – GE Announces World’s Most Powerful Offshore Wind Turbine, The Haliade-X

Kijkje in een Windmolen

E.A.Z. Small Wooden Wind Mills

[wattisduurzaam.nl] – Groningse startup EAZ Wind plaatst 100e houten windmolen

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Siemens Reports EROI Onshore Wind of 50 or Larger

Siemens SWT-3.2-113

According to the manufacturer Siemens has their SWT-3.0-113 wind turbine an energy payback time of 4.5 months. With a (conservative) minimum life span of 20 years, that would mean an EROI of 240/4.5 = 53.

[siemens.com] – Press release

Power to Gas: That’s how Wind Power is Stored

Technology has matured enough to produce effective wind turbines. The next technological challenge is how to store intermittent electricity generated by these wind turbines. The most promising technology is power-to-gas: use electricity from wind to split water in H2 and O2 molecules and burn (reunited) them at a later point in time.

This project produces 163 bar hydrogen, without the need of an external compressor. The resulting hydrogen can be directly fed into the existing natural gas network.

[omv.com] – Hydrogen technology
[omv.com] – Renewable energy? Let’s store it!

The Netherlands Might Become One of the Largest Offshore Wind Markets

[offshorewind.biz] – Ørsted: The Netherlands Might Become One of the Largest Offshore Wind Markets

RVO.nl Issues Hollandse Kust (noord) Geotechnical Soil Investigations Tender

An agency of the Dutch ministry of economic affairs has issued a tender for the investigation of the soil in the projected areas of a large wind farm, “Hollandse Kust” (Dutch Coast),

[offshorewind.biz] – RVO.nl Issues Hollandse Kust (noord) Geotechnical Soil Investigations Tender

Nordex Awarded 180-MW Project in the Netherlands

Location: Wieringermeer, 60 km north of Amsterdam.
Substance: 50 N117/3600 turbines

[nordex-online.com] – Nordex Awarded 180-MW Project in the Netherlands
[wikipedia.org] – Nordex SA

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Energy Island(s) North Sea Taking Shape

After TenneT TSO B.V. (Netherlands), Energinet (Denmark), TenneT TSO GmbH (Germany) and Gasunie (Netherlands), it is now the Port Authority of Rotterdam that is backing plans to build one or more wind power hub islands in the middle of the North Sea, starting from 2025. This is significant as the Port Authority has broad experience in acquiring new land from the sea. These hubs could play an important role in realizing the intended 70 GW to 150 GW offshore wind power in the North Sea by 2040. Adhering to the Paris Accords, 180 GW needs to be installed in the North Sea by 2045. Every energy island should collect 10-30 GW and transport the energy via connectors to the Netherlands, Germany, Denmark, Norway and Britain.

The second use of these socalled Power Link Islands is the production of hydrogen via power-to-gas conversion installations and brought onshore via existing pipeline infrastructure. And thirdly, large converterstations in the middle of the sea would no longer be necessary. And finally, these islands could function as maintenance hubs for nearby wind parks.


Converter platforms like this one soon superfluous?

[tennet.eu] – Havenbedrijf Rotterdam vijfde partner in North Sea Wind Power Hub-consortium
[tennet.eu] – TenneT presenteert ideeën voor schaalvergroting van windenergie op Nederlandse Noordzee
[northseawindpowerhub.eu] – North Sea Wind Power Hub

World Primeur – Lagerwey Self-Climbing Crane in Action

As of now, large wind turbines can be assembled without the need for the usual external giant cranes. Instead the wind tower under construction can be used itself as a crane. this reduces the cost of wind turbines construction considerable. The Lagerwey L136-4.5MW costs 4,5 million Euro if constructed conventionally. By applying the self-climbing crane, cost reduction amounts to “several hundreds of thousands of euro” over the total cost of the wind turbine.

Additionally it is now possible to install a wind tower at hard-to-reach places, like mountains ridges or dikes. Old school cranes require a transportation effort of 150 truck trailers, the self-climbing crane merely three. Additionally it is no longer necessary to prepare the ground for the weight of large eternal cranes. Installation cost self-climbing cranes: 20% of the conventional installation cost.

[eemskrant.nl] – Wereldprimeur in de Eemshaven; Lagerwey zet zelf klimmende kraan in bij bouw windturbine
[zonnepanelenophetdak.nl] – Lagerwey ontwikkelt eerste zelfklimmende hijskraan

World’s Largest Windturbine Nears Completion

Note water reservoir at the bottom of the tower.

Location: Gaildorf, Baden-Wuertenberg, Germany
Hub height: 178 m
Total height: 246 m
Investment: $81 M
Yearly return: $7.6 M
Annual production: 10.5 GWh
Payback time: 10.6 year

Apart from these impressive figures, the turbine has an innovation in the form of a “natural storage” facility. At the bottom of the tower, the turbine has a water reservoir of 40,000 m3 that communicates with a lake reservoir at 200 m lower altitude and connected with a 5 km long pipe. This reservoir represents a potential energy of 22.2 MWh or five hours worth of max. windturbine output. Energy efficiency: 80%.

[windpowerengineering.com] – Max Bögl Wind puts turbine on THE tallest tower
[de.wikipedia.org] – Naturstromspeicher Gaildorf
[naturspeicher.de] – The Naturstromspeicher – Our Big Green Battery
[wattisduurzaam.nl] – ’s Werelds hoogste windmolen staat in een piepklein stuwmeer

[source]

Dutch Company Comes to the Rescue of US Offshore Wind

America has an archaic protectionist law called the Jones Act from 1920. The law says that transport between two American harbors can be done only with American-built ships with an American crew. This law effectively kills US offshore wind development before it gets a chance to be born, because America, as an offshore wind developing nation, doesn’t have the equipment to install offshore wind parks. Offshore wind technology is world-wide for more than 90% a North-West European affair, with installation vessels and crew all-European. European offshore installation in American waters violates the Jones Act.

The US has currently only one “windpark”, Block Island near NYC: 5 turbines with a 30 MW capacity, build by Europeans. When the Norwegian shipping company Fred Olsen crossed the Atlantic, the installation ship was not allowed to dock in a US harbor. This is not good for US offshore wind.

Now a Dutch company GustoMSC has come up with a simple design that can be constructed and operated by Americans and as such start the long overdue offshore wind development near the US coasts.

[gustomsc.com] – GustoMSC Reveals SEA-3250-LT
[wikipedia.org] – Merchant Marine Act of 1920 (“Jones Act”)
[deepresource] – The Seven Brothers – Europe Taking Lead in US Offshore
[deepresource] – The Enormous Energy Potential of the North Sea
[wattisduurzaam.nl] – Antieke wet frustreert offshore wind in VS, Nederland schiet te hulp

The Growing Importance of IJmuiden as Offshore Wind Hub

The Netherlands, currently the bottom of the barrel in Europe as far as installed renewable energy is concerned, has ambitious plans to change that. The port of IJmuiden, 15 km West of Amsterdam. wil play a central role in building more than 14 GW of offshore wind power in the coming years. Projects IJmuiden Ver and Hollandse Kust (“IJmuiden Far” and “Dutch Coast” resp.).

[offshorewind.biz] – A Hub in the Netherlands
[Google Maps] – IJmuiden

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